Haiku is a new open-source operating system that specifically targets personal computing. Inspired by the BeOS, Haiku is fast, simple to use, easy to learn and yet very powerful.

Fundraising 2014

Goal: $35,000
  $13,754

WHAT'S NEW IN HAIKU DEVELOPMENT

The Haiku source is continually built and released for testing purposes nearly every day. You can download and install these latest snapshots to check out the latest features and bug-fixes.

Be aware that nightly images may be unstable. Additionally, some packages included with official releases need to be installed separately.

If you're OK with this, you can find further instructions at our Nightly image page.

From Switzerland with chocolate

Blog post by mmu_man on Sun, 2012-07-22 01:51

Last week Olivier and I had the difficult task of handling the booth at RMLL and showing off Haiku in the land of gruyère, chocolate and banks.

Midterm Results: All students passed!

Blog post by mmadia on Tue, 2012-07-17 22:14

Over the weekend, Google processed the results for the midterm evaluations for Google Summer of Code 2012. I'm pleased to announce that all five students passed their midterm evaluations! As you may have seen, the students have been posting details on their progress and future plans on their blogs. Last month, two students even gained commit access. Alex Smith received it for Haiku's repository and Hamish Morrison received access to OpenJDK. Congratulations everyone and keep up the great work!

OpenJDK port: midterm report

Blog post by hamish on Sat, 2012-07-14 23:47

After my quarter term report I worked on various bugs in the AWT port reported by testers, such as keyboard input problems. I also began reading up on the media kit in preparation for the next part of my project: the jsound port. This will bring audio and MIDI functionality to the OpenJDK port. Over the last week I made a start on the implementation for PCM input/output.

BFS Partition Resizer: Midterm Report

Blog post by ahenriksson on Fri, 2012-07-13 16:23

A lot of things have happened since the last status update! As far as I can tell, the kernel part of the file system resizer is mostly complete. Some details remain, along with a healthy dose of bugs to be fixed. In addition, I've written a 'resizefs' command for bfs_shell. Let's look at a typical session with the mighty resizefs!

fssh:/> resizefs 100
File system information:
        Bitmap:     1 blocks (was 1)
        Log start:  block 2 (was 2)
        Log length: 512 blocks (was 512)
        Block size: 2048 bytes

Error:  Not enough space left.
Status: Invalid argument

NFSv4 client: midterm report

Blog post by Paweł Dziepak on Wed, 2012-07-11 16:58

Having implemented mandatory hooks by quarter term I had good base for implementing other operations like write, rename, create, etc. Moreover, improvements in file system migration and user ID mapping. Apart from that, file locks required most work, since they are both more complicated than other NFS operations and Haiku VFS originally did not allow the file system to handle them its own way.

cpuidle: midterm report

Blog post by yongcong on Wed, 2012-07-11 13:04

With the good preparation in quarter term/bonding period, I have completed the generic cpuidle kernel module, native intel cpuidle module and cpuidle driver(for states/info reporting). By original plan, these tasks will be all completed by the end of 3/4 term...

x86_64 port: midterm report

Blog post by xyzzy on Wed, 2012-07-11 11:08

Since my quarter term report I have made a great deal of progress. The boot loader x86_64 support is finished, and the kernel can now be booted to the point of searching for the boot volume. A screenshot of this:

Syndicate content