Haiku is a new open-source operating system that specifically targets personal computing. Inspired by the BeOS, Haiku is fast, simple to use, easy to learn and yet very powerful.

Fundraising 2014

Goal: $35,000
  $23,862

WHAT'S NEW IN HAIKU DEVELOPMENT

The Haiku source is continually built and released for testing purposes nearly every day. You can download and install these latest snapshots to check out the latest features and bug-fixes.

Be aware that nightly images may be unstable. Additionally, some packages included with official releases need to be installed separately.

If you're OK with this, you can find further instructions at our Nightly image page.

Haiku Down Under 2011 Report

Blog post by Sikosis on Sat, 2011-08-27 09:05

Haiku Down Under 2011It was a rather overcast day in Brisbane, Australia: Home of the Fourth Annual Haiku Down Under Virtual Conference for Haiku Users and Developers. It was virtual, in the respect, that the event was streamed live over the Internet once again using the uStream service.

We accept (and regret) that this service requires Flash, but at present, we still haven't found any other services that are capable of delivering the same features. One of these days, we hope to use a Haiku friendly service.

This year, HDU 2011 (#hdu2011) was hosted from one of the ITEE boardrooms at The University of Queensland where I, Phil Greenway (Sikosis) was joined once again by Mark Patterson (BeMark) and newcomer Daniel Devine.

Survey results in

News posted on Sat, 2011-08-20 15:53

Last year Dr. Miroslav Stimac asked the Haiku community to participate in a survey to gauge interest in Haiku, usage pattern and wishes for the future, and obtain some general demographic data. This was part of his master thesis "The desktop operating system Haiku" that can now be ordered as PDF or printed book.

Miroslav is so kind to provide chapter 6 with the survey and his analysis as a free download. While naturally being quite technical at times, it offers some interesting numbers that may also become useful when considering strategies in the future. At last we now have some hard empirical data instead of vague feelings concerning size or interests of our community at this point of Haiku's evolution.

A Decade of Haiku

News posted on Thu, 2011-08-18 18:12

Ten years ago today, the first post appeared on the mailing list of our project - then still called "OpenBeOS" - officially marking the start of our endeavor. Back then, with the imminent demise of Be Inc., there was an excitement and creative motivation in the air, that lead many to think a first release was only a matter of a few years. As it turns out, this estimation was a bit too optimistic...

Others didn't have confidence in the project and attested a quick dissolving before having anything to show. They were apparently wrong too. After ten years Haiku is still here and making progress. And with a quite stable and feature rich Alpha 3 we have a pretty good picture of what R1 will look like.

In those 10 years many developers came and went, and some are still around, coding away with a passion. With further progress more and more non-coders became active and did their part to improve the system. This continued passion and determination in realizing a shared vision makes me confident that we'll see Haiku around in another ten years time. I wonder what soon-to-be-released version of Haiku we'll be excited about then...

Package Management: Queries, Solutions, and the Status Quo

Blog post by bonefish on Mon, 2011-07-18 15:04

Alas the time of my contract with Haiku, Inc. is up. So besides giving some details about the query support and libsolv port which I've been working on since my last post, I'll also summarize where Haiku's package management stands now and what still needs to be done.

(R) II: Return to the USPTO

News posted on Thu, 2011-07-14 01:53

On July 12th, 2011, Haiku® received its registration with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). This registration is for "Haiku" the name (as opposed to the HAIKU logo®, which became a registered trademark in March). More precisely, this new registration is known as a "standard character claim" and affords much more protection than the "stylized mark" registration of the logo.

Now for a quick crash course in trademarks. First, trademarks are specific to types of goods or types of services. As an example, our trademark registrations relate to computer operating systems, but not to washing powder. In layman's terms, a "stylized mark" is a specific representation of a trademark. In our case, the HAIKU logo consists of the word "HAIKU" in all uppercase letters, with 3 leaves that partially cover some of the letters. That registration is specific to that description (and similarly confusing marks). A "standard character claim" is more generalized, flexible, and stronger. That registration applies to any form that "haiku" can take -- whether it be as typed characters or a graphical representation.

So, back to the question that many of you may be wondering -- "What does this do for the Haiku Project?" It strenghtens everyone's ability to associate "Haiku" with the computer operating system that the Haiku Project creates. Additionally, it provides some artistic freedom. Let us imagine a purely hypothetical scenario to illustrate how this "standard character claim" registration provides that. Some years have passed and the project decides to create a completely new logo for Haiku. In this imaginary scenario, that new logo would be protected by the "standard character claim" registration. In short, it affords us the confidence that there will be only one operating system that can be called Haiku, no matter what the logo looks like.

Lastly as a reminder, Haiku, Inc. provides a page describing the trademarks and their proper usage.

Haikuware Donates $10,000 to Haiku!!!

News posted on Thu, 2011-07-07 20:30

That's right, you read that right. And no, today is not April 1st. Haikuware has donated Ten-Thousand Dollars to Haiku, Inc.

Haiku, Inc. gratefully values each and every dollar that is is donated. A contribution of this magnitude, well, it simply is astounding. In other words, thank you once again, Haikuware!

Package Management: Bits and Pieces

Blog post by bonefish on Mon, 2011-07-04 13:28

Time does fly. It has already been two weeks since my previous blog post, so I guess an update is in order. The support for shine-through directories and the package links has been implemented as planned and works nicely as far as I have tested them. Other than that I've worked on a few odds and ends.

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