Haiku is a new open-source operating system that specifically targets personal computing. Inspired by the BeOS, Haiku is fast, simple to use, easy to learn and yet very powerful.

Fundraising 2014

Goal: $35,000
  $23,862

WHAT'S NEW IN HAIKU DEVELOPMENT

The Haiku source is continually built and released for testing purposes nearly every day. You can download and install these latest snapshots to check out the latest features and bug-fixes.

Be aware that nightly images may be unstable. Additionally, some packages included with official releases need to be installed separately.

If you're OK with this, you can find further instructions at our Nightly image page.

Obligatory BeGeistert Report

Blog post by mmu_man on Tue, 2009-10-27 05:10

I'm in the TGV back to Valence on wednesday, which luckily has many power plugs, unlike the Thalys which has wifi but no plug for those battery-drained guys like me. It's 21:30 as I start writing this. Will take some more days to finish though...

Not there yet

But first things first, after attending a meeting on Friday in Grenoble, I headed back to Valence to leave some stuff there, then back to the train station, where my train got delayed by an hour or so. But the other frenchies I was to share a car with were also a bit late, so they didn't have to wait for me too much. We then took the road to Düsseldorf and started to talk about each others work, and GSoC since we had two of the students on board.

My Experience At the Florida Linux Show 2009

Blog post by leavengood on Mon, 2009-10-26 19:27

On October 24, 2009 I attended and spoke at the Florida Linux Show in Orlando, FL. In this post I'll talk about my experience at the conference.

My Ohio LinuxFest 2009 Journey

Blog post by jprostko on Wed, 2009-10-14 18:50

Well, after a long delay and BeGeistert 021 among us, I suppose it's time to tell my story about the Ohio LinuxFest (OLF).

My friend, Amir, and I set out to Columbus from Pittsburgh on the Friday evening before OLF, and as we traveled, I could already feel the excitement. Once settled at the Hyatt hotel, I scrambled a bit to build/install Haiku on my MSI Wind U100 netbook. I also let Amir try out a live CD on his laptop, and we shared some conversation about Haiku. He wanted to come to OLF mainly for the various talks, and naturally I was there to help man the Haiku table. As he slept, I eventually got my system set up as I liked it with a GCC4 hybrid trunk build (with additional apps/media), and then went to sleep for a couple of hours.

This was my first time being at the OLF, or any computer-related event for that matter, so I didn't know what to expect. Upon meeting Darkwyrm and Mike after registration, I felt right at home and knew the day would go just fine.

Don't miss this BeGeistert!

Blog post by stippi on Sat, 2009-10-03 10:48

This time I am very happy to be part of the organization team for BeGeistert, the bi-annual gathering of BeOS and Haiku fans in Düsseldorf, Germany. That's because I get to see who registers, and I can tell you that I am almost bursting with excitement, since this BeGeistert will be a big one! Beside the regular BeGeistert visitors, this time there are people coming whom I've known for years only via the Internet and who I can now finally meet in person. And there are also a bunch of old-timers coming who didn't participate in the event in years. Even new contributors will show up for the first time, like some of this year's Google Summer of Code and Haiku Code Drive students.

Ohio Linux Fest... What a Ride!

Blog post by darkwyrm on Sun, 2009-09-27 19:13

Well, for not having been doing hardly anything Haiku-related in the last month or so, this kind of made up for it. It all started with almost not getting a table at the conference and then on Wednesday--if I remember correctly, that is-- suddenly having one by the power of Greyskull, um, I mean Koki. ;-) This meant a flurry of e-mails, burning what remaining CDRs I had around the house, quickly putting together a Haiku demo machine, and a host of other details.

I arrived at the Greater Columbus Convention Center at about 7:15 am to set up and was quickly met by Michael Summers, whom I've known since the first WalterCon years ago, and Joe Prostko. We had been concerned about not having a projector, particularly on such short notice, but as we found out, it wasn't really necessary. We had a six-foot table, Joe's MSI Wind netbook, my Thinkpad R40 laptop, some live CDs, a bunch of fliers Urias had sent us, a couple of chairs, and some great neighbors in the non-profit section: the Northeast Ohio Open Source Society (NOOSS) and The Linux Link Tech Show (TLLTS). Setting up didn't take long, and even at that early hour there were already a lot of people there besides the sponsors.

Alpha 1: A Week Later

Blog post by nielx on Mon, 2009-09-21 13:00

Exactly one week ago, on a simple Monday in September, we pulled the lever. Though it had been anticipated in more than one language, it was a relief when suddenly a whole new website appeared, and more importantly, this update had something called a release, a thing relatively unknown in Haiku's universe. I still remember being in the IRC channel, when Michael Lotz proclaimed: "I can't believe the other devs are letting me do this" while he was tagging the source code for the final alpha build.

So what happened after that?

Wrap-up Reports 2009 : Google Summer of Code, Haiku Code Drive

News posted on Mon, 2009-09-21 03:18

This year eight students were funded to work with Haiku during the summer months, six from Google in their Google Summer of Code program and two from Haiku Inc. for Haiku Code Drive. It is both my pleasure and honor to announce that overall this year has been more successful than last. Five of the six Google Summer of Code students passed, as well as one of two Haiku Code Drive students. On top of this achievement, Adrien Destugues and Bryce Groff were granted commit access for Haiku. Maxime Simon was approved by WebKit to receive commit access as well!

Before getting into the actual results for each student, it is worth re-visiting how we got here. This is the third year in which Haiku was selected to participate in Google Summer of Code. Each year we, as an organization, strive to improve our process for both the participating students and our community. Perhaps the most significant modification was the introduction of requiring students to resolve one or more tickets in our bug tracker. The intention was to ensure each applicant had a minimal level of exposure to our project. This includes navigating and building Haiku's source code, as well as communicating through our mailing lists and other collaboration tools. Having the requirement fairly open ended allowed the applicants to provide our mentors with initial insight to their motivation, skill, and communicative abilities. The results speak for themselves: an increased number of passing students puts the proverbial stamp of approval on this new addition to our selection process. And now for the summaries for each student...

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