Haiku is a new open-source operating system that specifically targets personal computing. Inspired by the BeOS, Haiku is fast, simple to use, easy to learn and yet very powerful.

Fundraising 2014

Goal: $35,000
  $13,754

WHAT'S NEW IN HAIKU DEVELOPMENT

The Haiku source is continually built and released for testing purposes nearly every day. You can download and install these latest snapshots to check out the latest features and bug-fixes.

Be aware that nightly images may be unstable. Additionally, some packages included with official releases need to be installed separately.

If you're OK with this, you can find further instructions at our Nightly image page.

Website in Read-Only Mode Due to Upgrade in Preparation For Alpha 1 Release

News posted on Wed, 2009-09-09 16:37

Redesigned Haiku websiteThe redesigned Haiku website

In preparation for the upcoming Haiku R1 Alpha 1 release, we are working on a Drupal upgrade and a redesign of the Haiku website. As a result, haiku-os.org is scheduled to operate in read-only mode from approximately September 9th at 17:00 through the 14th at 00:00AM (UTC). During this time, no major outages are expected and the website will be online for the most part, but the following operations will be disabled:

  • Creating new accounts
  • Editing existing accounts
  • Posting new content (to forums, blogs, documents, etc.)
  • Editing any existing content
  • Posting new comments or editing existing ones

The upgraded website is scheduled to be fully operational in time for the Alpha 1 release date. Until then, please use the mailing lists or our IRC channels as means of communication with the community. Our bug reporting tool http://dev.haiku-os.org is unaffected, and will continue to operate as usual.

OSCON & OpenSource World 2009 Double Report

Blog post by koki on Thu, 2009-08-27 19:00
Urias at the Dell booth at OpenSource World.Urias at the Dell booth during OpenSource World.

It's been about a month since Urias, Scott and myself represented Haiku at the O'Reilly OSCON 2009 conference in San Jose, and approximately two weeks since we exhibited at the OpenSource World 2009 conference in San Francisco. I think this is the first time that we exhibit at not one but two events in a row, and we don't write any reports; and that is a real shame. So here I am, after some very serious procrastination, finally attempting to give a recount of both events in a single blog post. Like we say in Argentina, better late than never... :)

OSCON 2009: Way Beyond Expectations

OSCON is an open source event organized by O'Reilly, a well-known company whose core business is to foster technological innovation by publishing books, holding conferences and providing online services. I had never been to OSCON before, so I did do some reading about it prior to applying for a booth earlier this year; beyond all the usual stuff (history, demographics, etc.) that I could find on their websites, what caught my eye was a statement about this year's OSCON, which I quote: "If the first ten years of OSCON were about opening the minds of big business to the philosophy of open source, are the next ten years about opening the minds of the open source community to the possibilities of its future?". Quite interesting articulation indeed, I thought, and one that raised my expectations for the event to a motivational level. I can say now that, luckily, those expectations were not only met, but even surpassed: OSCON 2009 was a real blast, the kind that you don't ever want to miss again.

Finally a Haiku ARM port update

Blog post by pfoetchen on Tue, 2009-08-18 13:46

After quite some time I finally update my blog ;). A lot has happened in the last few weeks... The Haiku loader that gets loaded by u-boot finally is able to load the kernel and start it and we even have minimal framebuffer support running.

haiku_loader

In the previous posts I said that we would use the U-Boot API to write the loader, the problem with that is, that the API is not accessible on most U-Boots so we could not use it on early boot and had to write our own functions for serial output etc. Because of that the kernel is now loaded from a ramdisk instead of directly loading it from the sd-card as planned (but that might change later...). It also has the disadvantage, that the loader code is not completely platform independent anymore so we would have to rewrite it to be used on a PPC board with U-Boot for example.

Since we still need to know where to find the ramdisk for example (unless we hardcode it..) we decided to use the U-Boot image format that allows packing the loader and the ramdisk in one image and tell the loader where everything is and what parameters to pass to the kernel etc.. For this task U-Boot has OS-specific code since there is no standardized way of doing this. Since there was no Haiku specific code we would either have to convince the U-Boot developers to add Haiku support or simply masquerade as an other operating system. We choose the second option and François Revol added support for the netbsd way of booting so that we get the position of the ramdisk and the kernel parameters and some other info that is not yet used. He also created an jamtarget to allow to build an image directly.

The Informal Summer Gathering - USB HID, Filesystem bug-squashing and Media Kit encoding

Blog post by stippi on Sun, 2009-08-02 18:49

After I didn't write the promised report on the last Coding Sprint which took place after BeGeistert in April, I am now trying not build up an even bigger lag. Last week, Axel and his girlfriend Claudia hosted Michael, Ingo and myself at their nice home in Hannover, Germany. Oliver could sadly not attend our small, relatively spontaneous and informal Coding Sprint due to sickness, although he seemed to be with us in spirit considering all his ICU commits. (The ICU libraries are an important foundation of the forthcomming Haiku Locale Kit.)

Haiku Coming to OSCON 2009 in San Jose

Blog post by koki on Mon, 2009-07-20 18:31
OSCON 2009 logo

As some of you may have noticed under the Upcoming Haiku Events box on the front page, Haiku is making its debut at the upcoming O'Reilly Open Source Conference this week. Also known as OSCON 2009, this conference will be held at the San Jose McEnery Convention Center (Google map) from July 20th through the 24th. Haiku will be exhibiting along many other Open Source orgs on July 22 and 23; our booth number is 14; to locate us in the exhibit hall, check out the floor plan (138KB PDF).

During the two days of the OSCON exhibits, Scott McCreary, Urias McCullough, and myself plan to demo the latest nightly builds of Haiku, introduce newcomers to our project and operating system, and ask answer (duh!) any questions that visitors may have about Haiku. For demo purposes, we have prepared a cube-style desktop PC that will be hooked to a projector (similar setup from the SCaLE 2009 conference), an Acer Aspire One netbook and a possible an additional laptop computer. We will also have Haiku flyers at hand.

Haiku WebKit Port Patches Are Now Being Committed Into the WebKit Repository!

Blog post by leavengood on Fri, 2009-07-17 06:11

After much effort from my GSoC student Maxime Simon and plenty of gentle coaxing from WebKit reviewers, I'm proud to announce that the various patches to add support for Haiku as a platform in WebKit are now being committed!

Maxime took my code from the original Haiku port I made in 2007 and updated it for the latest WebKit, which changes a lot daily, so you can imagine the state of the port after a few years! Still it was good to see that my previous effort was not to be wasted and it did not take Maxime long to start posting bugs and patches at the WebKit Bugzilla site.

Locale kit: quick developer guide

Blog post by PulkoMandy on Thu, 2009-07-16 16:36
This week I was at the RMLL in Nantes, and I was busy showing Haiku to other people and explaining them why it was so much better than linux. I had little time for GSoC coding. Still, I made some cleanup and fixed some small bugs. The catalog part of the locale kit is now working fine and can be used to internationalize applications. Here is a small guide for those who want to get an application speaking in their own language.

Sourcecode changes

You have to alter your source code to get it working. We've tried to make this need as little changes as possible. First, you have to #include two files : Catalog.h and Locale.h. They are system headers from the locale kit. Now you have to tell the locale kit to initialize a catalog for you. A catalog is a class that you will use to map strings to their translated equivalents. The locale kit will automatically find the right data files for you, depending on the system-wide language preferences, you application mime signature, and some other magic (see the part of this post about the build system changes). So, you only have to add two lines of code:
BCatalog cat;
be_locale->GetAppCatalog(&cat);
Syndicate content