Haiku is a new open-source operating system that specifically targets personal computing. Inspired by the BeOS, Haiku is fast, simple to use, easy to learn and yet very powerful.

Fundraising 2014

Goal: $35,000
  $23,862

WHAT'S NEW IN HAIKU DEVELOPMENT

The Haiku source is continually built and released for testing purposes nearly every day. You can download and install these latest snapshots to check out the latest features and bug-fixes.

Be aware that nightly images may be unstable. Additionally, some packages included with official releases need to be installed separately.

If you're OK with this, you can find further instructions at our Nightly image page.

Haiku makes it into Google Summer of Code for third year in a row

News posted by mmadia on Wed, 2009-03-18 23:59
Haiku GSoC 2009 flierHaiku GSoC 2009 flier (pdf & hi res PNG)

Haiku's application for Google Summer of Code 2009™ has been accepted!

This year, the role of Haiku's Google Summer of Code primary administrator has been taken up by Matt Madia, with Stephan Aßmus acting as the backup administrator. Over the past few days, Google program administrators evaluated a total of 395 Mentoring organization applications and published their list of those accepted on Wednesday, March 18th 19:00 UTC. As you may imagine, time had seemingly slowed to a crawl in anticipation of the results!

As usual, we have created a list of suggested ideas. We encourage interested students to begin considering possible projects and more importantly to engage yourself in our community!

Here's some anecdotal data involving Google Summer of Code from the past and this year. The number of mentoring organizations has grown from 40 in 2005, to 100, to 130, and up to 175 in 2008. There were roughly 500 mentoring applications in 2008, however a good portion of those were "spammy" and does not represent an accurate count of actual applications. Google's application process this year has greatly reduced the number of "spammy" applications. The number of participating students in 2005 was 400 and has grown over the years to 1125 as of last year. For this year, Google will be establishing a cap of around 1000 students for 2009.

Haiku presence at Chemnitzer Linux-Tage

News posted by umccullough on Sat, 2009-03-07 08:43

If you happen to be visiting the Chemnitzer Linux-Tage conference on March 14-15, 2009, make sure to stop by the Haiku booth and say "Hi!". Attending this year on behalf of Haiku will be Stephan Aßmus, Axel Dörfler, Denise Wein and Daniel Wünsch.


Chemnitzer Linux-Tage 2009

The Haiku booth is next to the one of the Fedora Linux project, together with many other open source operating systems like FreeBSD, Ubuntu, openSUSE, NetBSD, OpenBSD, etc.

The Chemnitzer Linux-Tage are an event around the topic Linux and open source for everyone. The entrance ticket costs 5 EUR for both days (3 EUR for students). The event will be held at the following location:

Universität Chemnitz
Reichenhainer Straße 90
Chemnitz, 09126

Haiku at SCaLE 2009: the Report

Blog post by koki on Tue, 2009-03-03 20:13
Haiku booth at SCaLE 2009Haiku booth at SCaLE 2009

After a long week of chronic procrastination, here is finally my report from the recent SCaLE conference. The 7th Southern California Linux  Expo, familiarly known as SCaLE 7x, was held at the Westin Hotel Los Angeles Airport Hotel on February 20th through the 22nd, and Haiku had its booth for the third year in a row. SCaLE is a bit special for me, as it was the first show that I did for Haiku (back in 2007) and because that's where Haiku made its debut at a big open source conference; I personally view this first appearance combined with the now renowned Haiku Tech Talk that we gave at the Google Mountain View offices soon after (Google video available here) as a sort of turning point for a project coming out of obscurity and starting to make it in front of the eyes of the world. Melancholic aspects aside, SCaLE is a popular open source event that combines abundant and rich speaker tracks with an exhibit floor that has a healthy mix of open source projects and businesses, so it is a great place to raise awareness and promote the project among a small but well qualified audience of mainly geeks and business people both involved in open source.

Website Upgraded to Drupal 5

News posted by nielx on Wed, 2009-02-25 19:49

This Saturday, the 28th of February, the software that powers the website, Drupal and 47 (!) modules, have been upgraded to the Drupal 5 platform. This upgrade creates the foundation to continue to improve the functionality and information on our website, as the demands change, also in the face of the upcoming Alpha 1 release.

While the upgrade team has concluded that most of the data migrated smoothly, there are some rough edges. Most notably, the data of the conferences did not migrate properly, and as such, we are now in the process of reconstructing the conference module. Please read on for a more detailed list of issues. Naturally we expect some more minor issues popping up. If you find any one of them, please check out the list below, and if the issue is not there, drop a comment!

The known issues are the following:

  • The conference functionality has disappeared.
  • Pages like the about page show authoring information, while it did not used to.
  • The OSNews and Slashdot icons are missing from the teasers
  • The Read more link needs some styling.
  • The image system needs an overhaul.
  • The legacy docs need to be restored. Reported by adek336
  • The lay-out underperforms on wide screens. Reported by kallisti5.
  • The new image gallery (thanks Remi!) has a wrong reference to certain paths
  • Updated copyright notices (meta tags and footer)
  • Changed "Haiku Screenshot Tour" under the "Learn More" block in the About page to point to the new gallery.

Drop a comment if there is more. We did not thoroughly test the functionality with the different permission groups. Is anything not working, while it used to work? Drop a line!

FOSDEM 2009 report

Blog post by mmu_man on Mon, 2009-02-09 15:01

Here is my own report about what happened at FOSDEM. Actually so many things went on I probably missed some.

Getting there

For this second time at FOSDEM, I tried to get a shared devroom with other projects, but there were so many requests we only had a booth. We probably wouldn't have had enough material alone for two days anyway. Besides, manning a booth itself is already quite demanding.

Haiku Finally Gets a Native GCC4 - full story inside!

News posted by umccullough on Sun, 2009-02-01 04:25
Michael's Quad-core compiling GCC4.3.3Michael's Quad-core compiling GCC4.3.3

As many Haiku community members know, one major hurdle that has been making it difficult to port new software to Haiku has been the lack of an up-to-date GCC4 compiler. While a GCC 4.1.2 cross-compiler has been available now for some time, cross-compiling software for a GCC4-built Haiku can be painful and frustrating. What Haiku really needed was a native GCC4 toolchain to run on a GCC4-built Haiku install.

That time is now! A native Haiku GCC4.3.3 is now a reality.

Michael Lotz set out to tackle this task and the fruits of his labor have finally been committed to the Haiku repository for all to benefit from.

Michael Lotz details the process he used

To demonstrate what process was necessary to perform this task, he has written a detailed blog post recounting his experience. It's a long read, and certainly lists some confusing concepts. If you were at all curious what it would take, going from a GCC2-built Haiku to a GCC4-built Haiku with its own native compiler, the steps are all there.

During the process, Michael was even "fortunate" to find and submit a patch for a bug in libiberty. You will read about the strange behavior that led to the discovery in his blog post.

Dogfooding is important... Yummy!

If you're paying attention while reading his blog, you'll note that Michael is "dogfooding" during his Haiku development. Not only does he use Haiku for development purposes, but it's also the only operating system he uses currently. This suggests a couple of important points: a) Haiku is stable enough to use daily and develop in and b) Haiku developers are serious about Haiku, intending to use it as their daily OS. I know of several developers who use Haiku daily for various tasks, including development. This demonstrates a dedication to the quality they are pursuing, and increases the likelihood that even little annoying things about Haiku are going to get fixed eventually.

What does all this mean? What's next?

Freshly-built Haiku running GCC4Freshly-built Haiku running GCC4

So, what should we expect from Haiku now that it has a native GCC4 toolchain?

I'm not sure - and that's the exciting part actually! This opens the door for easier porting of modern software, and more easily moves Haiku out of the "dark" GCC2 cloud that BeOS had lived under.

Several existing Haiku porting projects already require GCC4 to proceed and/or update to latest versions: Firefox 3, Webkit, VLC, and more.

Haiku already supports a "hybrid" environment where it is built with GCC2 for backward compatibility but also providing GCC4 libraries for future software support - or even more interesting: a GCC4-built Haiku with GCC2 libraries for backward compatibility. I think we'll see the latter becoming more common now with the availability of a native GCC4.

There are still some minor loose ends to tie up - such as providing the remaining development tools for a GCC4 Haiku (the GCC2-built ones will work, but they are not yet automatically installed with the "Development" optional package). Additionally, those who wish to build a GCC4 Haiku from within an existing GCC2-built Haiku might find it a little bit challenging. If you'd like to experiment, you may want to compile your own GCC4 Haiku from Linux, BSD, etc., or even wait for the availability of pre-built GCC4 images to appear.

These are very interesting developments, I hope you're as excited as I am at what the future holds :)

Happy Holidays from Haiku!

News posted by umccullough on Thu, 2008-12-25 21:18

On behalf of Haiku, we'd like to wish everyone Happy Holidays!

While the news may seem a little slow lately (people are likely busy during the holiday season), there has indeed been a few things happening of note.

One exciting announcement was from Christof Lutteroth letting us know that some final-year projects from the University of Auckland were prototyped using Haiku. While these prototypes and the code behind them are not yet publicly available, they have generously offered to donate this code to Haiku in the future.

In other developments, we have seen some improvements to Haiku's network drivers, including a couple drivers ported from FreeBSD by Ithamar Adema to improve the wired LAN support for EeePCs. Ithamar has also reported that he would like to work on porting FreeBSD's wireless stack where Fredrik Holmqvist left off.

It also seems that Oliver Ruiz Dorantes has recently completed Phase 1 of his Bluetooth stack and thus completed the associated Haikuware bounty.

There have been many other improvements to Haiku recently and you can always see what's going on in the Haiku Trac Timeline if you need a "quick fix". :)

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